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R - Line Graphs

A line chart is a graph that connects a series of points by drawing line segments between them. These points are ordered in one of their coordinate (usually the x-coordinate) value. Line charts are usually used in identifying the trends in data.
The plot() function in R is used to create the line graph.

Syntax

The basic syntax to create a line chart in R is −
plot(v,type,col,xlab,ylab)
Following is the description of the parameters used −
  • v is a vector containing the numeric values.
  • type takes the value "p" to draw only the points, "l" to draw only the lines and "o" to draw both points and lines.
  • xlab is the label for x axis.
  • ylab is the label for y axis.
  • main is the Title of the chart.
  • col is used to give colors to both the points and lines.

Example

A simple line chart is created using the input vector and the type parameter as "O". The below script will create and save a line chart in the current R working directory.
# Create the data for the chart.
v <- c(7,12,28,3,41)

# Give the chart file a name.
png(file = "line_chart.jpg")

# Plot the bar chart. 
plot(v,type = "o")

# Save the file.
dev.off()
When we execute the above code, it produces the following result −

Line Chart Title, Color and Labels

The features of the line chart can be expanded by using additional parameters. We add color to the points and lines, give a title to the chart and add labels to the axes.

Example

# Create the data for the chart.
v <- c(7,12,28,3,41)

# Give the chart file a name.
png(file = "line_chart_label_colored.jpg")

# Plot the bar chart.
plot(v,type = "o", col = "red", xlab = "Month", ylab = "Rain fall",
   main = "Rain fall chart")

# Save the file.
dev.off()
When we execute the above code, it produces the following result −

Multiple Lines in a Line Chart

More than one line can be drawn on the same chart by using the lines()function.
After the first line is plotted, the lines() function can use an additional vector as input to draw the second line in the chart,
# Create the data for the chart.
v <- c(7,12,28,3,41)
t <- c(14,7,6,19,3)

# Give the chart file a name.
png(file = "line_chart_2_lines.jpg")

# Plot the bar chart.
plot(v,type = "o",col = "red", xlab = "Month", ylab = "Rain fall", 
   main = "Rain fall chart")

lines(t, type = "o", col = "blue")

# Save the file.
dev.off()
When we execute the above code, it produces the following result −



Table of contents: 
1. R - Overview
2. R - Environment Setup
3. R - Basic Syntax
4. R - Data Types
5. R - Variables
6. R - Operators
7. R - Decision Making
8. R - Loops
9. R - Functions
10. R - Strings
11. R - Vectors
12. R - Matrices
13. R - Arrays
14. R - Factors
15. R - Data Frames
16. R - Packages
17. R - Data Reshaping
18. R - CSV Files
19. R - Excel Files
20. R - Binary Files
21. R - XML Files
22. R - JSON Files
23. R - Web Data
24. R - Database
25. R - Pie Charts
26. R - Bar Charts
27. R - Boxplots
28. R - Histograms
29. R - Line Graphs
30. R - Scatterplots
31. R - Mean, Median and Mode
32. R - Linear Regression
33. R - Multiple Regression
34. R - Logistic Regression
35. R - Normal Distribution
36. R - Binomial Distribution
37. R - Poisson Regression
38. R - Analysis of Covariance
39. R - Time Series Analysis
40. R - Nonlinear Least Square
41. R - Decision Tree
42. R - Random Forest
43. R - Survival Analysis
44. R - Chi Square Tests

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